The Story of Hawks
Ridge at Big Lake

Hawks Ridge has been blossoming since 2010, with the first human residents moving in, in 2013. The first hawk took up residence shortly after – with about 220 families calling Hawks Ridge their home by the end of 2017. 

So far, about 80% of the community pathways are ready to use (which is excellent news for dog owners), while plans are underway for the construction and opening of several businesses and services in the near future.

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The Story of Hawks
Ridge at Big Lake

Hawks Ridge has been blossoming since 2010, with the first human residents moving in, in 2013. The first hawk took up residence shortly after – with about 220 families calling Hawks Ridge their home by the end of 2017. 

So far, about 80% of the community pathways are ready to use (which is excellent news for dog owners), while plans are underway for the construction and opening of several businesses and services in the near future.

Safeguard the Future

Protecting local wildlife is essential as we strive to build sustainable communities for present and future generations while minimizing impact to the surrounding environment. 

Along with the hawk, hundreds of other animal species call the Big Lake area their home. An essential part of the vision for Hawks Ridge was the preservation of natural wildlife corridors so that animals wouldn’t lose access to their natural habitats. 

In 2015, a key piece of infrastructure opened to pave the way for this part of the vision. Built in conjunction with Alberta Environment and the City of Edmonton, the Hawks Ridge Pass is a bridge on 215 Street that doubles as a wildlife crossing for animals moving about the environmental reserve. The structure is the first of its kind in Canada outside a national park.

With the community located right next to the Lois Hole Centennial Provincial Park, the Hawks Ridge Pass provides a way to protect local wildlife while simultaneously giving residents easy access in and out of the neighbourhood. Research being conducted by the University of Alberta is already showing positive signs of use by at least four species, including moose, deer, coyotes, and porcupines.

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Embracing Sustainability

Hawks Ridge offers several ways for residents to contribute directly to a sustainable future and help protect their wildlife neighbours (like our friend, the hawk). 

Restrictions on pesticides and chemical de-icers, as well as a unique system for treating stormwater and surface run-off, prevent harm to the lake. This will have the added benefit of significantly reducing eutrophication (a cause of algae blooms), which has been a significant threat to Big Lake. 

These initiatives will minimize the impact of development in the area so that Hawks Ridge can continue to grow and mature with confidence.

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